Urban Patterns Quiz

Congratulations - you have completed . You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
The central business district (CBD) contains all but which of the following?

A
Business services
B
Consumer services
C
Public services
D
A major athletic arena or stadium
Question 1 Explanation: 
While a major athletic arena or stadium certainly could be located in a CBD, not all cities have arena or stadiums, and those that do may not always locate them in the CBD.
Question 2
The CBD is at the center of

A
Burgess’s concentric zone model and Hoyt’s sector model
B
Burgess’s concentric zone model and Harris’s and Ulman’s multiple nuclei model
C
Hoyt’s sector model and Wallerstein’s core–periphery model
D
Harris’s and Ulman’s multiple nuclei model and Wallerstein’s core–periphery model
Question 2 Explanation: 
The core–periphery model is associated with world systems, not urban geography, and as the name implies, the multiple nuclei model does not have a single CBD.
Question 3
In the early twentieth century, if people in the lower economic class walked from their homes to a ring of factories and if middle class people rode streetcars to those factories, then the city most likely followed which of the following models?

A
The concentric zone model
B
The gravity model
C
The multiple nuclei model
D
The sector model
Question 3 Explanation: 
This view of the concentric zone model ties the rings to urban transportation.
Question 4
A city follows which of the following models when its neighborhoods are built around transportation corridors that radiate out from a CBD?

A
The concentric zone model
B
The gravity model
C
The multiple nuclei model
D
The sector model
Question 4 Explanation: 
The sector model follows many of the same principles as the concentric zone model, but it looks like pie-shaped wedges, not rings. The wedges are based on transportation routes. An industrial sector might develop along a rail line or river, and working-class residential sector might develop along a streetcar line.
Question 5
Bookstores, coffee shops, and pizzerias cluster around universities. Hotels, warehouses, and shipping services cluster around airports. Together, they represent the

A
The concentric zone model
B
The gravity model
C
The multiple nuclei model
D
The sector model
Question 5 Explanation: 
The lack of a single CBD and the clustering of businesses near their customer bases indicates the multiple nuclei model.
Question 6
Latin American cities are usually based on the

A
The concentric zone model
B
The core–periphery model
C
The multiple nuclei model
D
The sector model
Question 6 Explanation: 
Latin American cities have a CBD at their core and industrial park at the fringe. These two nodes are connected by an industrial corridor. A commercial corridor stretches to a huge mall in the opposite direction, and wealthy people live along the commercial corridor. A middle class radiates out from the CBD and commercial corridor, and poor people are on the fringe.
Question 7
As American cities redevelop their CBDs, they provide a mix of housing, recreation, entertainment, and cultural amenities. These amenities attract people who are in the upper-income brackets. This phenomenon is known as

A
Agglomeration
B
Counter-urbanization
C
Gentrification
D
Gerrymandering
Question 7 Explanation: 
Gentrification began in the United States in the 1990s as people with disposable income and without children desired a home close to the attractions of the CBD. It is associated with the rehabbing of old homes and the conversion of factories and warehouses to residential purposes.
Question 8
How is the concentric zone model different in European cities than it is in North America?

A
Europeans are drawn to the CBD for cultural opportunities
B
The upper classes tend to live in the first ring out from the CBD in Europe
C
Upper, middle, and low-income people live in homogeneous communities in Europe
D
Upper, middle, and low-income people live in heterogeneous communities in Europe
Question 8 Explanation: 
Gentrification occurred much earlier in Europe than it did in the United States. Wealthy Europeans want to be close to museums, concert halls, expensive restaurants, and other cultural attractions.
Question 9
Which of the following explains why one might find low-income people living on the suburban fringe in European cities?

A
European states give generous subsidies to mass transit
B
European cities have large numbers of squatter settlements
C
Zoning requirements prohibit people from living near the CBD
D
Socialist policies require people with low-incomes to live in the suburbs
Question 9 Explanation: 
European cities have extensive mass transit systems, which give freedom of movement to people of all income classed. In the United States, people who cannot afford automobiles may need to live near the CBD to access to jobs.
Question 10
If a metropolitan area develops a doughnut-shaped pattern in which the population density of the core declines while the population density the outer periphery increases, then the metropolitan area may be ringed with

A
Edge cities
B
Market areas
C
Satellite cities
D
Zones of disamenity
Question 10 Explanation: 
Edge cities are not necessarily true cities but serve all the functions that CBDs used to serve, and thus, they attract people away from the CBD.
Question 11
A city and its suburbs are known as a

A
Macropolis
B
Metropolis
C
Metropolitan statistical area
D
Urbanized area
Question 11 Explanation: 
This is a definition. “Macropolis” does not exist. A metropolitan statistical area is the second best answer, as an MSA may contain more than one city.
Question 12
The continuous area of urbanized land from Boston to Washington, D.C., is a

A
Hypercity
B
Megacity
C
Megalopolis
D
Megametropolis
Question 12 Explanation: 
This is a definition. Megacities are metropolitan areas of at least ten million people. Hypercities have at least twenty million people. There is no such thing as a megametropolis.
Question 13
An area of a city with improvised housing made of plywood, corrugated metal, sheets of plastic, and cardboard boxes on land that the residents do not own or rent is a

A
Exo-city
B
Squatter settlement
C
Tent city
D
Zone of disamenity
Question 13 Explanation: 
This is a definition. Tent cities are usually associated with refugee camps. Exo-city is a fictitious term.
Question 14
Which of the following was not a cause of rapid suburbanization in the United States in the 1950s?

A
Government-subsidized mortgages for veterans
B
Interstate highways
C
A post-war economic boom
D
Two-income families
Question 14 Explanation: 
Two-income families were not commonplace among middle class families until the 1980s. The other three answers were pull factors for the suburbs.
Question 15
Which of the following did not exclude African Americans from settling in the suburbs?

A
Redlining
B
Restrictive covenants
C
Widespread public transit
D
Zoning laws
Question 15 Explanation: 
The United States does not have the level of public transit that is present in European cities. If it did, then metropolitan areas might be better integrated.
Question 16
Suburban sprawl can be contained with

A
Annexation
B
Social area analysis
C
Smart growth plans
D
Urban renewal
Question 16 Explanation: 
Smart growth plans restrict were new construction can be and encourage the redevelopment of existing areas within a metropolitan area.
Question 17
The construction of which of the following paralleled the rise of suburbs in the 1950s?

A
"Big box” superstores
B
CBDs
C
New urbanism
D
Shopping centers
Question 17 Explanation: 
Shopping centers (also known as strip malls) were constructed in the 1950s and 1960s as part of automobile culture. Many were enclosed in the 1970s and became full-scale shopping malls. “Big box” superstores did not become popular until the 1990s.
Question 18
Which of the following is not true of gentrification?

A
It attracts high-income people to older parts of the city
B
It displaces low-income people from their homes
C
It is based in part on new urbanism
D
It frequently occurs in suburbs
Question 18 Explanation: 
Gentrification attracts people toward the CBD, not the suburbs.
Question 19
Which of the following theories, when applied to the local level, may explain the disparities in financial resources between cities and suburbs?

A
Borchert’s epochs of transportation
B
Sauer’s cultural landscape theory
C
Von Thünen’s land-use theory
D
Wallerstein’s world systems theory
Question 19 Explanation: 
Wallerstein’s world-systems theory is based on a core–periphery model. “Core” countries exploit less-developed countries on the “periphery.” This model can be adapted to explain the concentrations of wealth in the suburbs and extreme poverty in central cities. Basically, suburbs occupy a higher place in the urban hierarchy than central cities do. Borchert’s epochs of transportation would be the second-best answer as it partially explains economic segregation but does not explain disparities in financial resources.
Question 20
A group of people trapped in an inter-generational poverty from which it is difficult to escape is known as a(n)

A
Disenfranchised class
B
Impoverished class
C
Underclass
D
Working class
Question 20 Explanation: 
This is a definition. The underclass includes people who are long-term unemployed and/or homeless. They are below the working class in the economic hierarchy.
Once you are finished, click the button below. Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. Get Results
There are 20 questions to complete.
List
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678910
1112131415
1617181920
End
Return

 
 

More Quizzes

Geography Quiz >